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Jewish Hebrew Singing Circle: Shabbat Songs-CANCELLED

Come sing Original and Traditional Shabbat Songs with us.

The Jewish Hebrew Singing Circle gathers to sing Jewish and Hebrew music. Led by master musician and teacher, Ari Joshua and Rabbi Dov Gartenberg of the Heart of Shabbat Ensemble, we share a broad repertoire of liturgical, cultural, Israeli, and music from various Jewish lands and communities. We also have a growing repertoire of niggunim (wordless melodies new and old).   The idea is to have fun, to learn new music, and to sing harmonies.

At this circle we will be singing new and traditional Shabbat melodies.

The circle is open to all who love to sing regardless of faith and cultural background. Folks are welcome to drop in for single sessions, but we do recommend ongoing attendance to get the most from the singing circle.   No auditions are required.

When:    We meet the 2nd and 4th Sunday of the month, 4-6pm.

Dates for upcoming sessions through the end of 2017

November 12th, (no meeting on TXG weekend)

December 10th and 24th

Where: In Greenwood at Works Progress, 115 N. 85th St. Suite 202, Seattle 98103. Park in the alley south of the building opposite the rear entrance to Works Progress.

Organizer: Panim Hadashot-New Faces www.panimhadashot.org.

Contact: Rabbi Dov Gartenberg   dov@panimhadashot.org or text/phone at 206 257-1996

The event is free, but we would appreciate donations. Single sessions $10. To join the NFSC as a regular, we recommend a donation of $50. The NFSC is free to annual subscribers to Panim Hadashot-New Faces.

NAMI Family to Family Class sponsored by Panim Hadashot-New Faces

NAMI Family-to-Family is a free, 12-session educational program for family, significant others and friends of people living with mental illness. This particular class led by Rabbi Gartenberg is geared for Jewish families experiencing a loved one’s serious mental illness.

NAMI Family-to-Family is a free, 12-session educational program for family, significant others and friends of people living with mental illness. It is a designated evidenced-based program. Research shows that the program significantly improves the coping and problem-solving abilities of the people closest to an individual living with a mental health condition. NAMI Family-to-Family is taught by NAMI-trained family members who have been there, and includes presentations, discussion and interactive exercises.

This invaluable learning and support opportunity was initiated by Rabbi Dov Gartenberg who is a mental health activist and advocate.  He is formerly Executive Director of NAMI Juneau and is a trained Family to Family peer teacher.  This course is offered at the Jewish Family Service and offers specific insights for Jewish parents and family members.

This class will meet Tuesday evenings from 6:30-9 for 12 sessions from October 17, 2017 through January 9, 2018.  The class is free, but requires preregistration.  To sign up, please contact Talya Gillman at Jewish Family Service at tgillman@jfsseattle.org.

Alternative Erev Simchat Torah Celebration: A Seder to Honor the Torah

A Unique and Engaging Approach to Simchat Torah focused around a festival seder and engaging conversation about the meaning of Torah in our lives.

Join me for a Unique Seder Simchat Torah in which we celebrate and explore the meaning of Torah in our lives.  Join us for a festival dairy potluck meal at which we discuss the questions of

  • What is Torah?
  • How do we understand Torah in the 21st century?
  • What key Torah ideas present challenges to us?
  • How do we renew Torah in our complex lives?

This will be a stimulating intellectual evening, a different way to give honor to the Torah.

CLICK HERE to select a dish for the meal.

Build Sukkot, Not Walls-A Celebration-Protest by my Colleagues

From Haaretz, 10/9/17

Claiming that the president’s “anti-welcome” policies are antithetical to Jewish and American values, two dozen rabbis – men and women covered in prayer shawls – walked Monday morning from Central Park to Trump Tower, widely known as White House North. Once in front of the building, they quickly stretched out a small, symbolic sukkah and topped it with a wooden cover as required by tradition.

“Welcoming guests is an integral part of the holiday of Sukkot,” said Rabbi Jill Jacobs, executive director of T’ruah: The Rabbinic Call for Human Rights, a 1,800-member network of rabbis and cantors.

“President Trump’s executive orders and other policies break up families, turn refugees away from our shores – the very opposite of the sense of welcome that has defined our country’s history.”

CLICK HERE for the full article in Haaretz.

As the festival of Sukkot draws to a close, I wanted to highlight the way that the practice of hospitality which is central to its observance extends beyond the walls of our Sukkot.  Panim Hadashot-New Faces’ mission is to revitalize Shabbat and other forms of Jewish hospitality.  Our commitment to this act of lovingkindness also influences the way we regard the debate over immigration policies in the US.  Jews have benefited enormously from this country’s immigration laws in the past.  We also saw the calamity when immigration laws became too restrictive.  As leader of Panim  Hadashot, I strenuously object to the emergent policies of this administration.  I hope that the festival of Sukkot will help us to renew our resistance to these policies and to support approaches that are more generous and fair minded.

As we linger in the Sukkah over Shemini Atzeret, which begins this evening, may we reflect on ways we can add our voice to the advocates of decent and more immigration policies and to those working to secure the ability of DACA recipients to remain in the US without fear.  Hag Sameah,

Rabbi Dov Gartenberg

 

Jewish Hebrew Singing Circle

for people who love to sing!

The Jewish Hebrew Singing Circle gathers to sing Jewish and Hebrew music. Led by master musician and teacher, Ari Joshua and Rabbi Dov Gartenberg of the Heart of Shabbat Ensemble, we share a broad repertoire of liturgical, cultural, Israeli, and music from various Jewish lands and communities. We also have a growing repertoire of niggunim (wordless melodies new and old).   The idea is to have fun, to learn new music, and to sing harmonies.

The circle is open to all who love to sing regardless of faith and cultural background. Folks are welcome to drop in for single sessions, but we do recommend ongoing attendance to get the most from the singing circle.   No auditions are required.

When:    We meet the 2nd and 4th Sunday of the month, 4-6pm.

Dates for upcoming sessions through the end of 2017

October 8th and 22nd

November 12th, (no meeting on TXG weekend)

December 10th and 24th

Where: In Greenwood at Works Progress, 115 N. 85th St. Suite 202, Seattle 98103. Park in the alley south of the building opposite the rear entrance to Works Progress.

Organizer: Panim Hadashot-New Faces www.panimhadashot.org.

Contact: Rabbi Dov Gartenberg   dov@panimhadashot.org or text/phone at 206 257-1996

The event is free, but we would appreciate donations. Single sessions $10. To join the NFSC as a regular, we recommend a donation of $50. The NFSC is free to annual subscribers to Panim Hadashot-New Faces.

Home Sukkah Hospitality Event in Clyde Hill with Heart of Shabbat Ensemble

Another joyful event with the Heart of Shabbat Ensemble

If you would like to host a Shabbat or Festival Home Hospitality Event with the Heart of Shabbat Ensemble and/or with Rabbi Dov Gartenberg, CLICK HERE 

We always have room for a couple of extra new faces (Panim Hadashot). If you would like to join us, contact Rabbi Dov Gartenberg at 206 257-1996 or email him at dov@panimhadashot.org.

Sukkot/Shabbat Feast and Musical Tish with Heart of Shabbat Ensemble

A freilich Sukkot celebration with the Heart of Shabbat Ensemble. Great food, great music, great guests, great fun!

Join Panim Hadashot for a joyful and musical celebration of Sukkot Rabbi Dov Gartenberg and the Heart of Shabbat Ensemble led by Ari Joshua will lead a freilach Sukkot celebration with a catered feast by Eric Gorbman Catering.

Please bring a historical guest who you would like to invite to the Sukkah and tell us why you want to bring them with you. We will do an Ushpizin (the tradition of inviting ancient guests to the Sukkah).  We will be serenaded with great festival music and opportunities to sing favorite holiday songs and to learn new ones.

This evening will be filled with joy and fun and with great people.

Catered by Eric Gorbman Menu: BBQ Salmon, Northwest Style, Egyptian Chick Pea Salad, Hummus, Ajvar ( Balkan vegetable spread), Greek Salad, Roasted Vegetable Platter, Melon Platter, Brownies

$20 for adults

$10 for children between 8-13

Free for children below 8.

RSVP HERE

Sukkot Message 2017

Sukkot is called in the liturgy “the season of our joy”-zman simchateinu. Honestly, it does not feel in the world as a season of joy. Our hearts go out to the devastated inhabitants of Puerto Rico and to the victims and their families of the horrific mass shooting in Las Vegas. (Please continue to donate tzedaka to help them.) Everyday we are confronted with a leadership crisis we never could have imagined last year at Sukkot. And so many more events around the world challenge any sense of joy we could attain.
However, the traditions around Sukkot exhibit an understanding about how troubled our world is as well as the need to dig deeper for the joy that is at the heart of this festival. The “book” of this festival is Ecclesiastes-Kohelet which is easily one of the most dark books of the Hebrew Scriptures. It’s tone of weariness about the world seems completely out of synch with the description of the holiday as a period of joy.
Many have reflected about the asymmetry of reading Kohelet during Sukkot. My take on this pairing is that Sukkot asks us to find joy through simple gratitude while we acknowledge the realities of the world we live in. We find joy in the appreciation of shelter, of our enduring relationships of family and friends, of the joy of sharing our bounty with strangers and guests. The humbling act of building or eating in or even residing in a temporary booth-sukkah can bring to us an awareness of the basic conditions that enable us to live with gratitude. “Who is rich? Ben Zoma asks in Pirkei Avot, “those that are content with their portion.”
Sukkot is the festival of hospitality-hachnasat orchim. It is a great mitzvah to invite guests into the Sukkah. Our tradition considers hospitality the joy of doing a mitzvah-“simchah shel mitzvah.” I believe this relational dimension of Sukkot is key to understanding joy. We find joy in active connection with others. Sharing our table, our homes, our sukkot is a basic ingredient for joy.
Panim Hadashot-New Faces is an organization that is centered around Jewish hospitality practices. We view hospitality all year around as not only an way to personal joy, but a practice that improves the world and brings joy to others. I love Sukkot for this reason. It demands that we acknowledge the world around us, but that we not succumb to despair. We start building the joy from within most temporary structures and build outward from there.  Similarly, we build the joy within ourselves and extend it to others in an ever expanding circle.
I wish you a joyous festival and the strength to build resistance to despair from the difficulties of the world.
May you be worthy of a Sukkat Shalom, a Sukkah of peace,
Rabbi Dov Gartenberg

Sukkot Home Hospitality Event in Meadowbrook Neighborhood

You can have something like this at your home.

If you would like to host a Shabbat or Festival Home Hospitality Event with the Heart of Shabbat Ensemble or with Rabbi Dov Gartenberg, CLICK HERE 

We always have room for a couple of extra new faces (Panim Hadashot). If you would like to join us, contact Rabbi Dov Gartenberg at 206 257-1996 or email him at dov@panimhadashot.org.