Please Invite Us to Your Home for Shabbat!

September 2017, Elul 5777

 To my fellow Jews,  

Please invite us to your home for Shabbat!  I know this sounds hutzpidik (audacious), but we would like to team up with you to create a wonderful experience of Sabbath joy and to share with you the beautiful practice and mitzvah of Shabbat hospitality. I invite you to become a host and to team up with us to be a Shabbat Hospitality Partner.  

We do something unique. We team up with hosts all around Seattle to celebrate an experience of Sabbath joy through home hospitality, music and song, and engaging conversation around a Shabbat meal.   We add one ‘Hiddush’ (innovation) to this ancient Jewish tradition.  We utilize master musicianship to share and sing melodies from the great treasure house of acapella Shabbat music with you and your guests. We can also share much more, including Israeli and contemporary Jewish music (and American masters such as Dylan, Cohen, and Simon)

As a Shabbat Hospitality Partner, we offer for your Shabbat home event our gifted musicians of the Heart of Shabbat Ensemble.  I’m part of the ensemble as a singer, teacher, and a facilitator of timely discussions.

Shabbat Hospitality Partners invite their circle of family and friends and a couple of new faces (acquaintances or people outside your circle of friends. Hence our name).  We can come to your home on a Friday or Saturday evenings (Havdallah) and even on Festivals such as the upcoming holidays of Sukkot and Hanukah.   

We do not charge hosts to host because we want to show how wonderful it is to practice the ancient Jewish traditions of hospitality. Nor do we insist that your kitchen be a certain way.  Rather, we want to make it easier for people to do Shabbat Hospitality and to experience what Shabbat can be.  Whether you are an experienced Shabbat host or someone who has never hosted, we believe that this experience will be precious and inspiring to you and your guests.   

During these troubled times, we cannot think of anything more important than to bring folks together and raise their spirits, and renew their hope to make the world a better place.  

All the information you need to learn about how Shabbat Hospitality Partnerships work is in this online guide including a way to RSVP and setup your event.   We have dates open through February 2018. We recommend that you RSVP soon to get your preferred date.   

Let me know if you are interested in becoming a Shabbat Hospitality Partner.

Thanks for considering this unique opportunity to share in a mitzvah.  Shannah Tovah, 

 Rabbi Dov Gartenberg

Convener and Director of Panim Hadashot-New Faces

What is Jewish Hospitality?

Panim Hadashot-New Faces is a community focused on the practice of Jewish hospitality. The Jewish hospitality traditions go back to Abraham and Sarah in chapter 18 of the Book of Genesis. Abraham greets and feeds guests soon after he had circumcised himself. The Rabbis saw his readiness to welcome guests even when he was physically uncomfortable as an indication of his extraordinary kindness. In rabbinic literature, the act of hospitality (hachnasat orchim) is greatly cherished and is regarded as a sign of good character and generosity.

The term “panim hadashot”-new faces is found in the Talmud to refer to the practice of inviting people in the community to share in the joy of bride and groom by inviting them to the ancient tradition of seven days of feasting and singing for the bride and groom following a wedding. The guests at these parties had to be new faces who had not attended the wedding celebration. The purpose of inviting new faces was to share joy and abundance with others beyond the bride and groom’s family and friends.  We draw inspiration from this old hospitality tradition.  We reintroduce this practice to modern Jews by helping households to practice home hospitality and the making our Sabbath and Festival tables a welcoming space for new faces-“panim hadashot.”

Jewish hospitality is associated with the observance of the Sabbath. It is traditional to invite guests to the home Sabbath table either on Friday evening or during the Sabbath day.  One sign of a strong synagogue community is an invitation to a newcomer at a home for a Sabbath meal after the service.

Panim Hadashot-New Faces is committed to reviving and adapting the Jewish hospitality traditions in our modern context in which Jewish households are spread out over a wide geographical area and many Jews are not observant or are regular synagogue attenders.   We see Shabbat home hospitality as a way to revitalize a sense of Shabbat in people’s lives. We do this by sharing with our hosts and their guests the best of Jewish music and teachings while opening up the joys of hospitality, relaxed conversation, and sharing a bountiful meal.     

Our hope is that our hosts will endeavor will also open their home to new faces, people outside their family and friendship circle. Welcoming the stranger is a very important feature of classical Jewish hospitality. When we practice hospitality we are able to share our Jewish values as an expression of living in a free, diverse society as well as to learn about the values of the those we host. In a troubled world where people talk of building walls, we wish to do the opposite.  The words of Rabbi Jonathan Sacks express the vision guiding our understanding of Jewish hospitality in a world of diversity.

“There is all the difference in the world between the attempt to impose your faith on others and the willingness to share it with others. Our faiths are different. Judaism is not Christianity; Christianity is not Islam; the Abrahamic monotheisms are different from Eastern mysticisms on the one hand, scientific humanism on the other. Yet when we bring our respective heritages of wisdom to the public domain, we have no need to wish to convert others. Instead, we are tacitly saying, ‘if this speaks to you, then please take it as our gift.’ Indeed, it is yours already, for wisdom (unlike revelation) belongs to us all. The willingness non-coercively to share our several traditions of moral insight is, in a religiously plural culture, an essential part of the democratic conversation, indeed of societal beatitude.”

Introducing the New Mission Statement for Panim Hadashot-New Faces

Over the past few weeks I have been meeting with friends and with our newly formed Panim Hadashot-New Faces Advisory Board to review our mission statement. I am happy to unveil Panim Hadashot-New Faces revised mission statement.

New Tagline:  Revitalizing Shabbat Hospitality

Meaning

Panim Hadashot-פנים חדשות  (Pah-neem Chah-dah-shote) means “new faces” in Hebrew.  It is an ancient Jewish term associated with hospitality and the Sabbath.  

Mission

Panim Hadashot-New Faces fosters Sabbath joy (Oneg Shabbat) by encouraging home hospitality, reviving the tradition of table singing through our music, exploring timely Jewish teachings, and bringing ‘new faces’, people from diverse backgrounds, together in celebration.    

What We Do

Panim Hadashot-New Faces is a unique Jewish organization that teams up with hosts all around Seattle and surrounding communities through our Shabbat Hosting Partnerships to bring Sabbath joy to home gatherings with our Heart of Shabbat Ensemble. We also provide opportunities for all those we touch to enjoy the song, music, learning and prayer offered by our Heart of Shabbat Ensemble at Shabbat, Festival, and High Holiday gatherings open to the entire community.

Commentary on the mission statement by Rabbi Dov Gartenberg

“Panim Hadashot”; One of the early debates within Panim Hadashot concerned whether we should use an English or a Hebrew name.   Panim Hadashot was conceived in 2004 as a Jewish outreach organization. The general assumption of those doing Jewish outreach at the time, was that an English name was essential to connect to unaffiliated Jews. We chose not to go in this direction and keep the name Panim Hadashot. Our English tagline in the early days was different and was changed to “New Faces” in 2015 to reflect our more recent focus on Jewish hospitality practice. We serve the entire Jewish community both affiliated and unaffiliated.

“hospitality and the Sabbath”; The term Panim Hadashot appears in the Talmud and refers specifically to the practice in antiquity of inviting new faces to wedding parties for a bride and groom in the week following the ceremony. It was customary to fete the couple, but new faces had to be invited to recite the celebratory seven blessings. I saw this practice in Jerusalem after my nephew’s wedding. The couple was sitting in their apartment with family and a couple of us were sent downstairs to the street and instructed to yell, “panim hadashot”. Sure enough several folks volunteered to join us and we brought the new faces upstairs to the party and the singing began. I was quite taken with this ancient practice which combined hospitality and the spreading of joy in both directions, to the bride and the groom and to the new guests.

This memory inspired me to adopt the name ‘Panim Hadashot’ when we founded the organization.   I envision Panim Hadashot as a Jewish organization that would revitalize Jewish hospitality practice and the cultivate home spirituality of associated with Shabbat.

In Kabbalistic literature the Sabbath is also referred to as “panim hadashot” to suggest that every Sabbath is in a sense a new face to be welcomed.

Our view of Shabbat is that it is a time of hospitality, rest, renewal, singing, and feasting. It is a time of transcendence that is shared with others. These insights animate our approach.

“Sabbath joy (Oneg Shabbat)”; Thanks to the insight of Anna Boiko-Weyrauch we altered our mission statement to reflect our ultimate purpose of our home centered programs. We hope to bring people to experience the joy of Shabbat. ‘Oneg Shabbat’ is a much more far reaching concept than most realize. Most American Jews think that ‘Oneg Shabbat’ as the cookies and cake served at the synagogue after Friday night services.

Eating comfort food on the Sabbath is an ‘Oneg Shabbat’, but so is physical intimacy of a married couple. Oneg Shabbat conveys the unique joy of Sabbath that differentiates it from the weekday. The joy is both physical and spiritual and is essentially relational-shared together with others. This is the joy we seek to evince in our home visits, our music, and our teaching. Our hope is that an authentic experience of ‘Oneg Shabbat’ binds people together and creates community and fellowship.

“home hospitality”; Our previous tagline was “revitalizing Jewish hospitality”. The Jewish hospitality traditions are rich and varied and are not confined to the Sabbath. But Shabbat home hospitality is the core focus of a hospitality practice and all else flows from it. Prior to modern times, the huge majority of Jews lived within walking distance to their synagogue and were thus living close to each other. Shabbat hospitality was a direct outgrowth of a local Sabbath observant community. This is still true of traditional communities to this day and is one of the appeals of living in such a community.

But most Jews in the US no longer live in proximity to a synagogue or are strict in their Sabbath observance. For lot’s of different reasons home hospitality has declined among liberal American Jews along with setting apart the Sabbath day.

One of our main aims is to help restore the home as a central arena for Jewish life and spirituality and to reimagine hospitality and Shabbat celebration in the new reality we live in.

“reviving the tradition of table singing through our music”; I have always loved to sing and as a young adult I discovered the Jewish traditions of Sabbath table songs when I served as a counselor at Camp Ramah in 1976. One of the big drivers of Panim Hadashot is to revitalize the practice of singing at home. It’s actually not so unusual. We do our Passover Seders at home and I can’t think of many homes that don’t do Mah Nishtanah or Dayeinu and many more melodies.

The innovation of collaborating with hosts to come to their homes is central to our approach. From the beginning of Panim Hadashot in 2004, I would team up with hosts to do a Shabbat meal together at their homes. I would lead the rituals, give interpretation, and lead a few songs. The novelty of these home gatherings was having a rabbi come to the host’s home to share in your Shabbat celebration.

There was something flawed about this early approach since it put the focus on me, the visiting rabbi. When I returned to Seattle in 2015 and revived Panim Hadashot I wanted to try enhancing the home Shabbat in a different way.   Why not center the experience around music and singing.   We gathered together an ensemble of musicians and singers (including me) and began bringing the group to home Shabbat gatherings in the fall of 2016. The ensemble took on the name, The Heart of Shabbat Ensemble, to emphasize that our music was Shabbat centered and was designed to cultivate participation, group singing, and joy.

“new faces, people from diverse backgrounds”; In this polarized time, we aspire to encourage pluralism by encouraging our hosts to invite people who are different from them in background and point of view. One of the problems I found as a congregational rabbi was the cliquishness that overtakes communal Jewish life and makes integration into congregations very difficult.   I saw that people were often closed off from meeting others outside of their close knit circles. Even people who practiced home hospitality carefully filtered who they would invite to their tables or became accustomed to spending time with a handful of friends over and over.

One of the key elements of a hospitality practice is curiosity, of wanting to hear the stories and experiences of people who come from different backgrounds. This is what we mean by new faces. This approach is embodied in the Hebrew saying, Mikol Mlamdai Hiskalti-I have learned from my teachers, which is interpreted to mean I have learned from every human being.

Rabbi Dov Gartenberg

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Please feel free to send comments, observations, and reflections to me at dov At panimhadahot.org.  Please also share any great home Shabbat stories.  I will post some of them in the blog.  DG  

Closing or Opening the Door on Passover

By Rabbi Dov Gartenberg

Erev Pesah, 2017/5771

Several years ago, one of my students for conversion to Judaism was invited with her Jewish boyfriend to a Seder in the local Orthodox community. A few days prior to the festival a guest who was coming to that Seder, upon hearing that a non-Jew was attending, reminded the host that it was forbidden to have a non-Jew attend the Seder.  The hosts consulted their rabbi, who informed them that his understanding of the law indicated that a non-Jew could not attend the Seder.  The hosts apologetically and awkwardly told my student that she could not attend.  She was surprised and hurt by the disinvitation, and ultimately decided against converting several months later.

The source for the practice of excluding the non-Jew at Passover is in Exodus.

“The LORD said to Moses and Aaron, These are the regulations for the Passover: No foreigner is to eat of it. Any slave you have bought may eat of it after you have circumcised him, but a temporary resident and a hired worker may not eat of it. It must be eaten inside one house; take none of the meat outside the house. Do not break any of the bones. The whole community of Israel must celebrate it. An alien living among you who wants to celebrate the LORD’s Passover must have all the males in his household circumcised; then he may take part like one born in the land. No uncircumcised male may eat of it. The same law applies to the native-born and to the alien living among you”. Exodus 12, 43-49

Many modern authorities have ruled that this passage only applied when the Temple stood when we still performed the Paschal Sacrifice.  Some others have ruled that non-Jews are welcome to attend the Seder, but should not eat of the Afikomen, since it stands in for the Paschal Sacrifice in the post Temple era. Conservative, Reform, and other liberal authorities find the reasoning behind the rule of exclusion no longer applicable or relevant.  The welcoming of non-Jews to a Passover Seder in liberal Judaism is so widespread that many liberal Jews are surprised to hear that a rule excluding non-Jews from a Seder even exists.

Hospitality on Passover is something that liberal Jews and many modern Orthodox Jews have broadly accepted, not only because we have integrated into the American social landscape, but because we understand that the themes of liberation from slavery and freedom are themes that we share with other Americans regardless of faith. 

I teach that Passover should be a festival in which we embrace hospitality and invite our non-Jewish friends to partake with us.  In 2017 the practice of hospitality is even more important as the new president has dramatically increased deportations and attempts to slam to the door on refugees and potential immigrants. 

It is true that Passover historically can be called the Festival of Identity.  It is the festival that marks the birth of the Jewish people. Before Egypt, the Israelites were a small family grappling with the transmission of the covenant with God.  But the sojourn in Egypt is described in the Torah as the birth of a nation, even as it was forced into servitude.  In our liberation we were no longer were just a family, but the people of Israel.

The importance of identity in the festival is reflected in the our parental obligation to tell the story to our children.  Relying on our best pedagogy and storytelling we are supposed to convey to the next generation our people’s experience of slavery and liberation.

I have always embraced and celebrated Passover as a festival of Jewish identity, but I don’t see the need to exclude others as following from the retelling and reliving our story of origin.  I strongly object to that tradition of exclusion. 

But I also do not believe that watering down the Seder and removing the celebration of our identity out of concern for discomfort of our non-Jewish friends robs the festival of its great power and emotion.

Rabbi Jonathan Sacks articulates how we can practice hospitality while celebrating our unique tradition in a pluralistic and diverse free society.  

“There is all the difference in the world between the attempt to impose your faith on others and the willingness to share it with others.  Our faiths are different. Judaism is not Christianity; Christianity is not Islam; the Abrahamic monotheisms are different from Eastern mysticisms on the one hand, scientific humanism on the other. Yet when we bring our respective heritages of wisdom to the public domain, we have no need to wish to convert others. Instead, we are tacitly saying: if this speaks to you, then please take it as our gift.  Indeed, it is yours already, for wisdom (unlike revelation) belongs to us all. The willingness non-coercively to share our several traditions of moral insight is, in a religiously plural culture, an essential part of the democratic conversation, indeed of societal beatitude.”  Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, To Heal a Fractured World p. 126  

This teaching on hospitality is critical during these times when pluralism, diversity, and freedom is threatened by hatred, narrow-mindedness, and demagoguery.

Following Rabbi Sacks, it is possible to understand the sharing our Seders with our non-Jewish friends, with those who fear deportation, with those who are fleeing persecution is essential this year.  Let us be generous in our practice of this hospitality not only on Pesah, but throughout the coming turbulent years.    

Hag Same’ah, Happy Passover

Rabbi Dov Gartenberg

The Origins of Jewish Hospitality

Rabbi Dov Gartenberg

Sunday, December 4, 2016

The word hospitality in modern parlance is commonly understood as an industry. To study hospitality at a school today is to learn about hotel management and business practices to follow to be successful in this industry. The term has been “capitalized”, referring to a way of making money by providing travelers and tourists shelter, meal service, and the amenities.

Yet hospitality is a practice and concept that has an older, deeper meaning.   The ancient Jewish practices of hospitality certainly revolved around welcoming strangers into the home and offering them food, shelter, and protection. But Jewish hospitality practices have different dimensions. My reflection about Jewish hospitality traditions center on two Hebrew terms associated with this ancient practice.

The first term is the classic rabbinic term for hospitality: הכנסת אורחים hachnasat orchim, literally “bringing in guests”. Joseph Telushkin in A Code of Jewish Ethics, volume 2 correctly notes that the Hebrew term implies that we should actively recruit (bring in) guests and seek opportunities to invite people to our home. (p.44).   The origins of the rabbinic term flow from the story of Abraham when he sees three men passing near his tent on a scorching day not long after he had circumcised himself. (Genesis 18). The Torah tells us that Abraham ran from the entrance of his tent to greet them. He proceeds to invite them in, shelter them from the heat, bathe their feet, feed them, and even walks alongside as when they leave. The Jewish hospitality traditions arise from these core texts. (I’ll explore these texts in a future blog entry.)

A second term for hospitality arises from rabbinic literature is פנים חדשות panim hadashot-new faces. The origin of the term derives from an ancient Jewish wedding practice not mentioned in the Jewish Bible. New faces-first time guests-were to be invited to the seven days of smaller wedding parties following the wedding at which the seven wedding blessings were chanted in honor of a new bride and groom.

This practice continues to this day in very traditional Jewish communities. I witnessed the practice when I attended a party for my nephew in the Har Nof neighborhood of Jerusalem during the week following his wedding. I accompanied his friend down the elevator to the street where he called out “panim hadashot”.   A few minutes later we brought back three men, perfect strangers to the folks gathered around in my nephew’s apartment (They were also needed to make the minyan of ten men required to chant the seven blessings.). These folks knew the script and immediately joined the party (separated between men and women) to sing the seven blessings in honor of the bride and groom.

The search for panim hadashot taught me about another element about Jewish hospitality practice. Jewish hospitality is about sharing joy and abundance with others beyond our immediate circle. The deeper insight of the tradition is that our joyful life experiences are uncommon and the awareness of the earth’s abundance is rare. In those uncommon moments, we practice hospitality with strangers to share our joy and abundance.

My experience of the practice of panim hadashot led me to wonder if it was possible to broaden its application and make it egalitarian.   Could it be possible to apply this practice of seeking new faces to apply to when we gather at our Sabbath tables. Years later when I founded Panim Hadashot in Seattle I followed through on this original insight.

Jewish hospitality as I understand it then combines both hachnasat orchim-the active bringing in of guests and panim hadashot-the act sharing of our joy and abundance with strangers, new faces.

Practicing hospitality is a profound commitment. It involves openness, generosity, readiness for encounter. It involves a willingness to leave our comfort zones in encountering new, unfamiliar persons in our intimate, private space.

 

Sukkot, Hospitality, and the Strangeness of the End of the Holidays

 

A Blog Post Rabbi Dov Gartenberg for the New Faces Blog

Completed on Friday, October 28, 2016/26 Tishrei, 5777

I love the festival for Sukkot for many reasons. I love the strangeness of building a temporary structure. I love the often-amusing annual effort to procure the Sechach-the cutoff branches needed to cover the Sukkah. I love sitting in a sukkah (on a dry day) with a coat on while enjoying the fall colors enveloping me. I love the special rain roof-(called a schlock) that I have to rig up for the Sukkot I have built in Alaska and Washington. I love the antiquity of the four species and the rain inducing shaking and circling we do with them. I love the reading of Kohelet-Ecclesiastes that we read in the synagogue.

The sense of roots that permeates this festival moves me deeply. This festival is so detached from the regular pace and homogenizing context of our lives. As I get older I love Sukkot more and more. While Sukkot is a wonderful holiday for children and for families, I find it is very much compelling festival as I move through my 60s and beyond.

But what I love more than anything on Sukkot is the ritual of Ushpizim, the invitation to ancient guests to sit in the Sukkah with us. Not only is Sukkot about physical hospitality, it is also about spiritual hospitality. The ritual of Ushpizin has us invite our ancestors into the Sukkah. What the ritual signifies is that hospitality helps us to transcend our limited lifespan. On Sukkot we are invited to imagine knowing and relating to our long dead ancestors. We express our desire to share a meal with them, talk to them about their lives, their worries, their satisfactions, and their aspirations. We may even crack a joke with them or tell a story.

This is the power of hospitality. It takes something that is remote, and brings it close. The strange act of inviting the forefathers and the foremothers into the Sukkah is making the distant, the ancient, the arcane past close and imaginable. So too with those strangers who live in the same arena of our lives. Their distance is not over generations, but rather of physical proximity, cultural difference, class status, or other outcomes of human complexity. The act of hospitality is the attempt to reduce alienation from others.

A number of social scientists have argued that human beings can only make as much as 154 friends or significant relationships.   The idea is that human groups have an upper limit of intimacy. If this is true, then hospitality is not so much about making friends, but also connecting to others outside our 154-person network. While we cannot befriend the whole world, we need to be connected to others who are different than us. This is the secret of the practice of hospitality.

******

I found this striking poem in the new siddur about this period immediately after the end of the fall Festivals. Lev Shalem on page 368

The Journey On by Tamara Cohen

The s’khakh on my sukkah

is browning,

the gourds are growing

soft from the rain

 

Soon it will be time to take

down the sukkah:

unscrew the screws,

unhinge the walls.

 

Soon these days of celebra-

tion will end

and i will drag the poles

back to the garage.

 

I want a prayer for this:

the courage to take down

what we erect,

the willingness to let the

temporary be temporary.

 

Because it is,

because the fullness of the

moon is no longer

but will be again.

 

We have been schooled

once more in the fragility

of shelter,

in the wisdom of walls and

the welcoming of guests,

in the joy of song and soup

shared outdoors.

 

Let us turn to Heshvan:

 

See how the etrog can

become a spicebox,

each clove piercing the

yellow skin,

a teacher for the year

ahead.

 

What was holy can be holy

again.

Jewish Hospitality in the 21st Century

What is Jewish Hospitality?

Panim Hadashot-New Faces is a community focused on the practice of Jewish hospitality. The Jewish hospitality traditions go back to Abraham and Sarah in chapter 18 of the Book of Genesis. Abraham greets and feeds guests soon after he had circumcised himself. The Rabbis saw his readiness to welcome guests even when he was physically uncomfortable as an indication of his extraordinary kindness. In rabbinic literature, the act of hospitality (hachnasat orchim) is greatly cherished and is regarded as a sign of good character and generosity.

The term “panim hadashot”-new faces is found in the Talmud to refer to the practice of inviting people in the community to share in the joy of bride and groom by inviting them to the ancient tradition of seven days of feasting and singing for the bride and groom following a wedding. The guests at these parties had to be new faces who had not attended the wedding celebration. The purpose of inviting new faces was to share joy and abundance with others beyond the bride and groom’s family and friends.  We draw inspiration from this old hospitality tradition.  We reintroduce this practice to modern Jews by helping households to practice home hospitality and the making our Sabbath and Festival tables a welcoming space for new faces-“panim hadashot.”

Jewish hospitality is associated with the observance of the Sabbath. It is traditional to invite guests to the home Sabbath table either on Friday evening or during the Sabbath day.  One sign of a strong synagogue community is an invitation to a newcomer to a Sabbath meal after the service in a home.

Panim Hadashot-New Faces is committed to reviving and adapting the Jewish hospitality traditions in our modern context in which Jewish households are spread out over a wide geographical area and many Jews are not regular synagogue attenders.   We see home hospitality as a way to revitalize Jewish connection and to inspire engagement with Jewish teachings, with the rich Jewish musical legacy, with the varieties of Jewish cuisine, and most of all to the Jewish practice of kindness to strangers.  Panim Hadashot does this by  fostering hosting partnerships all around Seattle.   

On a deeper level by practicing hospitality we are able to share our Jewish values as an expression of living in a free, diverse society.  We are also able to share with others who are different than ourselves.   In a troubled world where people talk of building walls, we wish to do the opposite.  The words of Rabbi Jonathan Sacks express the vision guiding our understanding of Jewish hospitality in a world of diversity.

“There is all the difference in the world between the attempt to impose your faith on others and the willingness to share it with others. Our faiths are different. Judaism is not Christianity; Christianity is not Islam; the Abrahamic monotheisms are different from Eastern mysticisms on the one hand, scientific humanism on the other. Yet when we bring our respective heritages of wisdom to the public domain, we have no need to wish to convert others. Instead, we are tacitly saying, ‘if this speaks to you, then please take it as our gift.’ Indeed, it is yours already, for wisdom (unlike revelation) belongs to us all. The willingness non-coercively to share our several traditions of moral insight is, in a religiously plural culture, an essential part of the democratic conversation, indeed of societal beatitude.”